Private Eye on the State of the ‘Namer of Clouds’ Home

7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London, the home of Luke Howard is on the Historic England At Risk register
7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London, the home of Luke Howard is on the Historic England At Risk register

Private Eye on the State of the ‘Namer of Clouds’ Home

We were pleased to learn that Private Eye, the British satirical magazine, recently published a story to publicise the sorry deterioration of the historic home of Luke Howard. In 1802, this 19th Century pharmacist and lifelong lover of the sky devised the naming system for clouds that we still use today. His legacy for the world of meteorology and far beyond cannot be underestimated.

The Grade II listed building at 7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London, is on the Historic England ‘At Risk’ register. It has for many years been left to decline by its owners, a property development company which plans to sell if off as apartments. This strikes us, along with Society members and friends in Tottenham, as a crime against the culture of the sky. Such a significant property should never be allowed by the developers to deteriorate like this. It is the only building in the whole borough of Tottenham to boast a blue plaque, which simply states that The Namer of Clouds lived and died here.

Call us crazy, but we think that some part, at least, of this fine old building should be made into the world’s first and only
MuseumOfClouds2

We don’t know what such a museum would include, but we’d love to hear what you think. Leave us a comment below!

Private Eye, 19 February, 2016
Private Eye, 19 February, 2016
43 Comments
  • […] they have found in the clouds, and are currently writing a proposal to create the world’s first museum of clouds. For as they point out, clouds remind us of transience, of expressions or states of being that come […]

  • Carol

    April 11, 2016 at 10:41 pm

    I fully support the idea of buying and restoring the home of Luke Howard and I sincerely hope it is possible to do so. Someone mentioned having it be part museum/part visitor and education center and that seems more dynamic than strictly a museum. Perhaps it could be a tourist destination and bring the town some income. Though I live in the U.S., I will support it in any way I can. I did a quick check of grants, funding, etc. and saw the Lottery Fund people mentioned and also this:

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LtSGB8aLJAxHGklNqBTFCHq-E8iVmcx3GbJFPHNsY_s/edit

    The financial assistance would be a much smaller amount than the Lottery Fund if granted, but every bit counts!

    If the home is purchased and the final result is anything like last year’s annual conference, it would be A-M-A-Z-I-N-G. That was the most well-run, varied, fun, and interesting conference I’ve ever attended — in large part because of Gavin P-P.

  • Fiona

    April 17, 2016 at 9:41 am

    Could English Heritage become the official owners if we raised the money to purchase it? Have we had any feedback from the current owners, i.e. are they even willing to consider selling??
    I am sure the money could be raised if the building was independently valued, taking into account the state it has been left to get in?

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