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Can anyone explain/name this phenomena?

Can anyone explain/name this phenomena?

Forums The Cloud Forum Can anyone explain/name this phenomena?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Avatar hygge 1 month, 4 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #353947
    Avatar
    Malcolm McKessar
    Participant

    IMG_0038IMG_0040IMG_0034

  • #353967
    George
    George
    Participant

    Looks like lenticularis, a pile d’assiettes where the stack is dramatically shifting off center. Lenticularis clouds are common in mountainous or hilly areas.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenticular_cloud

    Do you have more details about the circumstances? Where or how log did you observe it?

  • #356387
    Avatar
    hygge
    Participant

    George, that’s a champion suggestion; and congratulations to Simona Halep from Constanza, Romania’s first Wimbledon champion.

    You ask the right questions, Based on my guru (Clouds and Weather, R.K. Pilsbury) wave clouds occur when 1) There was an inversion of temperature with height 2) Wind direction was fairly constant with height 3) Wind speed increased with height 4) Wind speed at 2.000 feet was at least 20 knots.

    There can be a train of waves (not here). The stack is stationary; it can be set up by (even a low) ridge of hills (but not an isolated hill), and some way away (15 miles in one example).

    One questions whether there might be a ridge of hills to the right causing the stack, with wind blowing right to left. There can be a roll cloud below the lowest lenticular (turbulence), possible here perhaps.

     

  • #362946
    Avatar
    hygge
    Participant

    The UK Guardian Journal has a centre page spread picture today 19AUG2019 –

    Sunset and storm ‘An early evening at Eilean Donan Castle, near Dornie in the west coast Highlands of Scotland. Taken in 2016’ by Dave Harnetty/Guardian Community

    However I can not link to the picture because The Guardian uses Press Reader to protect it unless you sign up. (Google will give you pictures of the castle, seemingly a hotel now).

    My point is that the water and landscape to the left of their picture is not dissimilar to McKessar’s third picture above. And there is a (sunlit) pile d’assiette in roughly the same position. It’s a great monochrome picture.

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