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ASPERITAS The CAS Cloud Vol 3

ASPERITAS The CAS Cloud Vol 3

Forums The Cloud Forum ASPERITAS The CAS Cloud Vol 3

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    • #419912
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Volume 2 hit the 100 mark. A lot of fun there. Onward to another 100!

      Arizona Asperitas # 301

      Apr2919b4115Asp

    • #420411
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Yes Michael, let’s go to another hundre. You made a good a start for Volume 3 already.

      From an older series….

      2019-06 Wolken_0036-2

      Dutch Asperitas

    • #420784
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #302apr2919b4095Asp

    • #421818
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #303

      sept1216b7321Asp

    • #422390
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      2020-01 Wolken (20)-2

      Gently Curved

    • #422881
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Nice composition Hans!

      Arizona Asperitas#304

      feb1619b2340Asp

    • #423447
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas# 305

      apr1619b3745Asp

    • #423785
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#306

      jan2217b0316

    • #423867
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Thanks Michael.

      2018-03-03 Asperitas_0056 asr c klein

      One from an old series not yet used.

       

    • #423936
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #307

      may1919b4659Asp

    • #424718
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #308

      may1919b4699Asp

    • #425139
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #309

      nov1919b7067Asp

    • #425489
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas# 310

      mar0819b3037Asp

    • #425853
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#311

      nov2119b7053Asp

    • #425975
      Patricia L Keelin avatarKeelin
      Participant

      While taking a stroll through the archives today, I came across the photo below taken one late afternoon a few years ago. Just a hint of wave (does that count?), but here it is, nevertheless. Asperitas is such a lovely form, no matter where it rides the wind, so thank you Michael and Hans for continuing to share what rolls above your noggins in Arizona and across the pond in Holland.

      IMG_5627_sunset barn

    • #426254
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Thank you and yes, the waves count for me Keelin. I love the tender colors in the sky you spotted with this hint of asperitas. These long and gentle waves are exactly what attracts me in asperitas.

      2020-01 Wolken (23)-2

      More Waves

    • #426487
      Daniel Mitchell avatarDaniel
      Participant

      Michael— feels like you live in Asperitas, AZ!  I love the subtlety in “More Waves”, Hans, and Keelin, the warm color gradient in your waves photo — utterly lovely :-)

      Straight up stratus outside for us today, but digging through my archives— here’s a little ditty I was lucky enough to enjoy a couple of years back, created from the top of a parking garage. In post, I deepened saturation, mid and low contrast and structure to let the colors and edges pop. Even so, the photo is almost true to light with the multiple layers front to back— the sun was above the horizon and lit up the near clouds until it hit a wall of the blue/gray in front it could not pierce.  Canon 5d MkII, 235mm on EF70-200mm F2.8 (w/2x adapter), F/7.1, 1/200sec.

      We printed this one out on Canvas and have it on the wall above our headboard.

      2013-03-15-skyjourn-peacehealth-springfield-webres-1004

    • #426773
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Daniel, Very nice Asperitas photo! Lighting of Asperitas really makes a difference.

      Its my observation that the Valley of the Sun , Phoenix Az, has physical characteristics and due to its location, southeast of the Sierra Nevadas , combine to make it well situated to be a place to witness Asperitas. Weather fronts come down the Pacific coast and then try to go inland dumping most of their moisture in the mountains of  California. When the fronts are strong enough, they make it over the mountains and bring their moisture to the desert. The energy to accomplish that is usually considerable , the fronts sweeping across the desert in a whip lash hurry. So the hurly burly is there , and as well, the compressed layering of cloud is often included. The Valley is like a bowl. The north and east sides being the higher elevations. So as the fronts sweep in, there are forces at work that seem to create Asperitas. I believe every front that sweeps in creates Asperitas  somewhere in the Valley. I use to work near the eastern edge of the Valley and that area always had Asperitas if there was a system coming through. It was just a matter of keeping an eye for the event because the speed of systems blowing through the Valley is..quick. I’ve seen blue sky mornings, rainy afternoon and clear starry nightsky all in one day here. Of course the catch is..storms having enough umph to make it over the Sierra Nevadas. Usually they don’t. Thats why we are in a desert here. Looking at the dates of photos over the last few years,, it looks like an Asperitas event once every 6 to 8 weeks . But for some reason December and January have more than average Asperitas. The exception is during the Monsoon season where the weather comes from  equatorial Pacific rather than sweeping down from Northern Pacific. I’ve noticed  late November,anytime December and January once or twice in February and March with reliable Asperitas production..

      Arizona Asperitas#748  This shot is of a rare May event (2019). May usually has no clouds . I consider it a blue sky month.

      may1919b4611Asp

       

    • #426938
      Daniel Mitchell avatarDaniel
      Participant

      Michael— that is an awesome insight!  I live in the Pacific Northwest, so I could see how some of our big storm fronts in the early winter months would make it your way after blasting down out of the Aleutians and beginning to push inland south-southeast usually right over the top of the Willamette Valley where I live. We share weather!

      Here’s another Willamette Valley sampling from September 2015 (color filters added, structure & contrast enhanced for artistic interpretation and effect.)

      2015-09-25 Greenhill Skyjourn Webres-10012015-09-25 Greenhill Skyjourn Webres-10062015-09-25 Greenhill Skyjourn Webres-10122015-09-25 Greenhill Skyjourn Webres-1013

    • #426999
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Great explanation of your situation in the Valley of the Sun Michael and a;so from you daniel in the Pacific Northwest. It is obviously good cloud spotting over there. Great pictures from you both.

      No hills or mountains over here in Flatland. Just dunes. Nevertheless asperitas will visit us each year some times. Here is one from last summer.

      2019-06 Wolken_0036-2

    • #427517
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Great Asperitas shots Daniel! Yea, Arizona gets the left overs from California et al , if there is any.

      Arizona Asperitas #749

      apr1619b3788Asp

    • #427827
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#750

      nov1919b7047Asp

    • #427838
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      2019-06 Wolken_0009-2

      Dutch Asperitas

    • #428444
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #751

      nov0417b7856

    • #428865
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#752

      dec0819b7426Asp

    • #429274
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      After some days with boring blue skies this made a change. Also some raindrops but nothing got wet and the scent of petrichor filled the air.

      2020-04 Wolken (105)-1

    • #429966
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #753

      nov1717b8552B

    • #430780
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #754

      nov1717b8511Asp

    • #430969
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas # 755

      nov0417b7722Asp

    • #431053
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Thinking about it this could also be the Wave Thread, don’t you think Michael. We sail on!

      2020-04 Wolken (86)-1

    • #431312
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Hans- upside down waves

      Arizona Asperitas#756

      dec2619b7733Asp

       

    • #431448
      Patricia L Keelin avatarKeelin
      Participant

      Those wonder-ful waves sweep me off my feet, Michael, Hans, and Daniel. Sure wish they weren’t so rare around here. Just found this one from a few years back.

      IMG_6233_Asperitas

    • #431913
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#757

      dec2319b7559Asp

    • #432528
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #758

      dec0819b7425Asp

    • #433273
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#759

      dec2619b7724Asp

    • #433699
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#760

      dec0419b7320asp

    • #434130
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Nice composition in Arizona Asperitas#760 Michael. Next one was taken in a hurry a few days ago. I did not have time to change lenses not expecting this when I stepped outside. Nevertheless I did have my camera with me so used the wide angle that was mounted.

      2020-05 Wolken (129)-1

    • #434176
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Its great when normal life gets interrupted by a cloud phenomena! Nice capture Hans!

      Arizona Asperitas#761

      dec0519b7338Asp

    • #434483
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#762

      apr0820b8956Asp

    • #435416
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #763

      dec0319b7344Asp

    • #435912
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Thanks Michael. It is always a joy when something “different” in the sky is happening. It makes my day.

      From last year:

      2018-07 Wolken_0346-2

      Eyebrow Raising Asperitas

    • #436060
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #764

      dec0819b7417Asp

    • #436494
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#765

      dec0519b7351Asp

    • #437618
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#766

      dec0519b7343Asp

    • #438321
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #767

      dec0519b7352Asp

    • #438779
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #768

      dec0519b7367Asp

    • #438932
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      All very gentle waves of asperitas Michael. Here is one that looks like the skin of some reptile. What do you think. Does it belong to this thread?

      2020-06 Charigny (139)-1

      Scales

    • #439004
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Hans,,A similar type cloud can be seen in my  photo #750. The texture of the clouds, takes away from the upside down tossing and turning of the Asperitas.  So  your  photo belongs in Asperitas imho.. And yes, an incredible Asperitas event Dec 3rd 2019  traversed overhead very low. Seemed I could almost hear it. Lasted maybe 15 minutes and I didn’t catch it from the beginning.  It was a softly lit  Asperitas Undulatus event.

      Arizona Asperitas#769

      dec0319b7346Asp

    • #439316
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#770

      dec0319b7356Asp

    • #439954
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #771

      dec0319b7332Asp

    • #439985
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Thanks Michael. Soem of your latest also show lacunosus imho and he gentle waves as well.

      2017-08-11 Zonsondergang_0053 B&W ac klein

      B&W Asperitas

    • #440384
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #772

      dec0319b7329AspB

    • #441114
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #773

      dec0519b7356Asp

    • #442134
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      2020-07 Wolken (63)-1

      Two Days Ago

    • #442181
      Ruth Quist avatarRUTH QUIST
      Participant

      P1050579 (2)Wondering if some of this cloud activity could have a bit of Asperitas. Thanks for any assistance.

    • #442191
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Ruth Quist.. One way to determine if what you see is Asperitas is to look at it upside down.  The up drafts and rolling clouds are a lot more apparent. The darker clouds in your photo suggest they are lower than the brite alto-cumulus  in upper center.  Its my experience that lower cloud gets aspirated or demonstrates the phenomena. Therefore i think your photo captures the asperitas phenomena. Its perhaps a thinner  show of it but  the characteristics are there.

      Below is  shot that too, is not of a clear and easy Asperitas event. This shot is of small area off from a more serious Asperitas event . Still I think its Asperitas with some of the slightest of characteristics.

      dec2518b1060asp

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Michael Lerch avatarMichael.
    • #442199
      Ruth Quist avatarRUTH QUIST
      Participant

      Michael, you have an exceptional collection of Asperitas cloud formations shown in this forum. I was so hoping that I had a chance to see this cloud event. Thanks for the pointers, especially looking at the picture upside down.

    • #442281
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Last week I spotted some skies with a bit of the same as you both (Ruth and Michael) spotted in the last two posts. For me they all are examples of asperitas. Small areas but nevertheless the characteristic irregular undulations of asperitas are there.

      2020-07 Charigny (98)-1

    • #442472
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Small area asperitas give the opportunity to see what is going on above the undulations. Chaos comes to mind. The up drafts pulling cloud segments up and  the scatter of clouds show that flying thru an Asperitas event may not be a good idea.

      Arizona Asperitas #775

      mar1020b8854Asp

    • #442509
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      You may be right Michael about the chaotic nature of asperitas events. Your last one shows the deceiving calm wavy structure. here is another example of a small area event.

      2020-07 Wolken (25)-1

    • #442928
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      2020-07 Wolken (63)-1

      Capricious

    • #443130
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      2020-08 Wolken (8)-1

      Contrasts In The Sky

    • #443226
      Frank Le Blancq avatarFrank Le Blancq
      Participant

      Nice asperitas time lapse In Maine USA

    • #443474
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Thank You Frank for the cool video!

      Arizona Asperitas#776

      dec2619b7730Asp

    • #443823
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #777

      mar1020b8554AspB

       

    • #444449
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas $778

      dec2619b7734Asp

    • #444511
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      Hello All, I’m Dave from central Missouri, USA. This is my first post to a forum and actually I’m a little baffled on how to do this.

      I almost exclusively shoot clouds with an infrared converted camera. I love the way that infrared light illuminates clouds providing enhanced contrast to what visible light illumination provides. This photo is in monotone but I frequently leverage my camera sensor’s response to invisible IR light and produce colors very different than what is seen with visible light.

      On July 7, 2020, at 18:10 CDT, I witnessed 25 minutes of the writhing chaos of asperitas clouds from my rural home. I shot over 140 photos with my infrared converted camera. This photo is from early in the sequence.DSCF4999 0-2.2 dL3

    • #444512
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      This photograph was shot several minutes after my previously posted photo.  The fun was really ramping up at this time.  I was practically giggling, it was so overwhelming.DSCF5025 4-3 dL3.5

    • #444517
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Wow Dave, welcome here …. and these are astonishing pictures of asperitas. The infrared reveals a really turbulent and wild cloudscape. I remember that on on the 3rd of August a picture of yours was CAD. It was cirrus and also taken in infrared accompanied by a great explanation of the used method. The extra contrast the infrared gives is amazing. This is different than to try to enhance contrast  with all the tricks LR provides. I hope to see more of these from you.

      Hans

    • #444522
      Ruth Quist avatarRUTH QUIST
      Participant

      Dave,  you have taken some exciting, not to mention moody pictures.  Keep them coming.  These forums are great fun to share pictures and support each others creations.  Asperitas are one of the most thrilling clouds to see and photography.  A rarity for me.  Looking forward to more of your entries.

    • #444525
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Good show Dave! yes, Asperitas does overwhelm. I can’t help feeling very special to witness a good Asperitas event. .always a smile that is impossible to remove from my face. Your use of IR is  interesting!  Canon’s 6D  Is sensitive into the IR, beyond most other digital cameras and is a favorite for astronomy photogs for that reason. I have one and used the IR advantage mostly in B&W photography. Like you say, the contrast can make the clouds  really pop out from the background.

      Arizona Asperitas #779

      aug0619b6078ASP

    • #444581
      Patricia L Keelin avatarKeelin
      Participant

      ~~~ Wow!! Love the recent additions to this fantastic wild ride that Michael and Hans keep rolling. Beautiful drama captured, Dave, (positively enhanced by the B&W/Sepia tones), and a mesmerizing video, Frank.

      As Michael notes, witnessing Asperitas events brings a special feeling (like an “E-Ticket Ride” at Disneyland back in the ’50s!). I must add that even just seeing them online here brings delight to the day. So many thanks to all contributors above for sharing.

    • #444982
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#780

      dec3119b7793Asp

    • #445186
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      Thanks for the welcome to the forum. This is such an inspiring group of people. It truly made my day to have my first two contributions so warmly received.
      I’ve been comparing the photos I submitted to how they were presented in this forum. My photos as seen here are considerably smaller in size, have considerably less resolution, and are considerably more jpeg compressed than they were when submitted. I am also guessing that with something that can be as detailed as asperitas clouds a short view may be better than a long view. My big fat photos need to go on a diet.
      The following two photos are also from the July 19th asperitas event. I have cropped these photos, reduced them to 1200 x 800, and changed the jpeg compression to 90% quality, This resulted in an overall size around 200 Kb.
      So let’s see what happens. I welcome all the tips, tricks, and critiques anyone has to offer. Thanks.DSCF5048 1-6.3 dL2.5DSCF5055 1-3.2 dL2.5

    • #445330
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Great show you had in Missouri there Dave! ..

      In very general terms..I reduce my photos from full size down to about 4″ X 7″ (postcard)  size or  450 kb in size to get accepted to post here.  The exception is the vertical shots which CAS allows to be larger. Anyway you will figure it. Yes you end up with an original and then a CAS  smaller version of all your good stuff.

      Arizona Asperitas#781

      nov0417b7724asp

    • #445618
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      Thanks, Michael, I think I’m now heading in the right direction on processing at a smaller scale. My first photos were a whopping 2048 x 1368 when submitted.

      I like your photo, Arizona Asperitas#781. There seems to be some orderly structure to the chaos that I’ve seen in some of my photos. It’s hard for me to imagine how the different water vapor densities stay together in an asperitas cloud formation without becoming a homogeneous mix in all the turmoil.

      This is the last photo (infrared photography) of my July 19th asperitas encounter. I took it as I retreated to my garage when large drops of rain began to fall. This is a view to the east. The dark area of thunderstorms that had been sliding by to the south had widened and was approaching my backside from the west. The asperitas clouds were losing structure and drifting to the northeast. Winds were still gusting but had become northerly, different than the earlier random gusts from every direction. It took another half hour for the transition to full thunderstorm.DSCF5095 3-1 dL2.2

    • #445653
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Nice shot Dave. Its a matter of timing. I see mostly asperitas undulatus in the Phoenix Arizona area. So ,yes, there is more of a structure to what I witness. Its a matter of timing like any wave activity. To me, Asperitas is upside down wave activity…like being under water and watching a wave break as it approaches the beach. It appears the wave goes Up and rolls along until it crests and comes apart. Pictures capturing what goes on above the asperitas show many rising columns of cloud.It is interesting to wonder when an asperitas events evolves to fractus, where the line is drawn.

      Arizona Asperitas #782

      mar1020b8538Asp

    • #445730
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      I’ve gotten off track here and am having to rethink what I’ve been calling Asperitas cloud features. Today’s Cloud-a-Day of Stratocumulus lacunosus makes it clear that that has been a dominant feature in what I have been calling an Asperitas event.

      It is likely that only a few of my photos from the 140 I shot (in IR photography) over 25 minutes during the July 7, 2020, event are of Asperitas clouds. Checking against the International Cloud Atlas I see that most of my photos do not fit the description and do not belong in this part of the forum.

      On the plus side I witnessed an event that is burned in my brain but has still not completely coalesced into understanding.

      The first photo may or may not contain a small patch of Asperitas. The second photo is also from the event and was solidly identified by today’s CAD, It has features typical of many of my photos on that day.

      I have not located a description of how Asperitas clouds are formed and I am most curious if their existence is related in some way to how Stratocumulus lacunosus are formed.DSCF5011 3-4 dL2.2DSCF5070 1-3.2 dL2.2

    • #445775
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Dave..I can only suggest that there exists Aperitas Laconosus. I’ve witnessed such a development on many an occasion, usually at the end of an Asperitas event. Again. its a timing issue.  What actually is the physical cause, the physics responsible for the development we call asperitas? My rough understanding is ..a layer of stratus is acted upon by winds above the stratus. The speed of the winds and the direction in relationship to the speed and direction of the stratus I don’t recall exactly. Undulatus is caused by winds 90 degrees (?) opposed to the direction of the stratus. Since there is asperitas undulatus there is suggested ,wind speed has much to do with asperitas. Another thought is volume..how much space a blast of wind fills.

      The lacunosus phenomena is attributed  to different temperature layers of atmosphere descending and rising into  each other. Cold air condenses the moisture out of the atmosphere and warm air absorbs the moisture back into atmosphere. So the cloud pattern you see is the cold air descending and the holes are the warm air rising..The problem is the holes  in asperitas have visible clouds  but they are in column shape and very ragged, due to wind. What im suggesting , and it is only my opinion, is that the lacunosus we see near the end of an asperitas event may be in optics only, similar to an lacunosus we see at cirrus or altcum heights,but the physics could be different Again, Aperitas does mean mixed up,  indicating a multi-directional stirring of the atmosphere. So the thought that asperitas lacunosus  signals a equilibrium approaching, a calming down of the asperitus atmosphere seems possible. The one thing bears mentioning is that the lacunosus  I’ve photographed near the end of an asperitas event is usually almost ,f not directly, overhead.  Seeing the wavy nature of asperitas is difficult when overhead and easier when seen at an angle or farther away.

      So thats my 2 cents based on what little I  understand about a complicated physical event that happens to clouds. I will say that I’ve photographed Asperitas Radius. Posted those pics a long while ago. Asperitas Translucidus might be applied  to  #773, #778 and #780 above.Point is, there can be many types of Asperitas and like a lot of clouds there are phases of development and decomposure that take the phenomena thru various varieties. There is much study on inter-actions of various layers of differing temperatured liquids and gases. Asperitas seems to me a challenge to those in that field of study.

      anyway here is a  “asperitas lacunosus”  shot that was close by.

      Arizona Asperitas# 781

      oct0816b7685ASP

    • #446155
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Great Asperitas lacunosus Dave. The infrared makes it even more dramatic. And I like your thoughts on asperitas Michael. Dave: you cn find more examples of asperitas lacunosus when you go the gallery and select on these classifications. You will find them all. Altocumulus and stratocumulus as well.

      2020-07 Charigny (68)-1
      No Holes

    • #446607
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas# 782

      apr0820a8904Asp

    • #446797
      Dave Lochhaas avatarDave Lochhaas
      Participant

      In my last posting I succumbed to a moment of doubt about ID’s I had provided for several of my photos. Thanks to Hans for his insight and many thanks to the members posting in the Cloud Identification Help forum.

      This image is composed from two photos stitched together. Asperitas clouds were just beginning to emerge on the edge of the thunderstorm line to the south on July 19, 2020, in central Missouri.

      Infrared photography, false color.

      This image can be seen in high resolution on my Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/davelochhaas/50341602273/in/album-72157715288024491/

      DSCF5002+05 x-6 dL2.2

    • #446966
      Hans Stocker avatarHans Stocker
      Participant

      Very impressive and dramatic capture of Asperitas Dave. The infrared emphasizes the drama very well. Next one is a lot less dramatic, but the B&W approach is another way to enhance the drama a bit.

      2017-08-02 Aspritas_0097 B&W asr klein

    • #447052
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas#783

      apr0820b9100Asp

    • #447213
      Michael Lerch avatarMichael
      Participant

      Arizona Asperitas #784

      apr0820b9116Asp

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