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Cloud of The Month

Each month, we choose our favourite image from the Cloud Gallery.

Tuba (November ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Clay Craig) A ‘tuba’ is when a cloud extends a finger towards Earth. Young children often yearn to reach up and touch the soft mounds of a fair-weather Cumulus. So who can blame a cloud for

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Virga (October ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Mike Rubin) Those unfamiliar with the habits of our fluffy friends will claim that it never snows on warm, clear, sunny days. Of course, a cloudspotter knows that they are talking complete and utter nonsense.

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Altostratus (August ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Irene, East Queensland, Australia) Cloudspotters tend to think of the altostratus as a boring cloud. Indeed, it is a featureless, mid-level layer, which tends to give the sky a washed-out, overcast appearance. When it is thick,

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Cumulus (July ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Laura Billings) If the average person were to close their eyes and think of a cloud, chances are they would picture this little fellow, for the cumulus feels like the most generic of all the cloud

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Mamma (June ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Bill Lowe) With her pendulous udders, this mother's cooking up a storm. She's known as the mammatus cloud (mamma is the Latin for ‘breast’) and you can find her hanging out in the company of any

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Pileus (May ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © Justin Moore) Enlightened meteorologists will tell you that the ‘pileus’ is not so much a cloud as it is a cloud haircut. It is a supercooled-droplet bouffant, worn exclusively by the fashionable cumulus family. If you

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Lenticularis (April ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © John Lamb) The Altocumulus lenticularis is known affectionately by glider pilots as a ‘lennie’. It is an orographic cloud formation, which appears in mountainous regions as air, forced upwards over the range, cools and sheds its

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Stratus (March ’05)

(Click image to enlarge) (Image © David Fuller) After the cold, grey months of January and February, many in Britain will feel that they have seen quite enough of the overcast skies of the stratus. But they should not be too hasty

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