Attention All Cloudspotters

You can’t look around when you’re looking up, so we’ve had a look around for you.
If you have cloud news that you think we should include here, please email it to us at: contributions@cloudappreciationsociety.org.

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A Crown Flash

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Crown Flash

Back in 2011 we wrote a news item about the strange lights that can sometimes be seen dancing in the sky above storm clouds – Dancing Clouds. We saw in a recent post by the Bad Astronomer at Slate Magazine that these amazing light effects, caused by the ice crystals above the storm cloud aligning with the shifting electrostatic fields caused by lightening strikes below, were given a name back in 1971.

In a letter to Nature Magazine about a sighting in 1970, this amazing light effect was named “A Crown Flash”.


Clouds, Storms & Music Event at City University

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City-Event-for-website

On Thursday, 25th June, City University London will be holding an event, “The Weather Experiment: Clouds, Storms and Music” in conjunction with WAM (Weather Art and Music). Join author Peter Moore and singer Pierrette Thomet for an evening of art, music and weather. They will examine Robert FitzRoy’s forecasting experiment, John Constable’s famous cloud sketches and there will be music inspired by weather and the sea. There will be a book signing of Peter Moore’s The Weather Experiment afterwards.

A further participant at the event will be Professor of Applied Meteorology, John Thornes, who is also one of the speakers at the Cloud Appreciation Society Conference which is being held on 26th September 2015 at The Royal Geographical Society, London.


All Aboard the Cloud Lab: Crossing America in an airship

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cloudlab-groupshot

Tuesday 16 June 2015, 6.30pm to 7.20pm
Berrick Saul Building, University of York

The BBC series Operation Cloud Lab: Secrets of the Skies brought together a team of scientists who travelled across the US in the world’s largest airship. Along the way they discovered that pollution can affect hurricane strength and they even managed to weigh a cloud. Join Jim McQuaid of the University of Leeds as he reveals some of the amazing sights that ended up on the cutting room floor.

Free tickets available at yorkfestivalofideas.com or via York Festival of Ideas.


Explaining Lennies to The Weather Channel

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As part of our monthly segment on The Weather Channel, Society founder Gavin Pretor-Pinney stuck up a whiteboard and drew a diagram to show how June’s Cloud of the Month forms.



NASA map shows thirteen years of cloud cover News – The Weather Network

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NASA Map

Cloud enthusiast, Michelle Martin, recently posted a link on our Facebook page from The Weather Network. The image shows an average of 13 years of cloud cover data, from July 2002 to April 2015 with the data being collected by NASA’s Aqua satellite, using its Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument (the darker the colour, the less cloudy it is).

The full article can be seen on The Weather Network website


Sir Cloudsley Shovel

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Sir Cloudsley Shovel at Rochester Museum

Plaque at Rochester

Cloud enthusiast, Jan McIntyre, visited Rochester recently and whilst exploring the village her attention was caught by the decoration of a building and plaster plaque announcing “erected at the sole charge and expense of Sir Cloudsley Shovel in 1706″. Curious about the spelling of dear Cloudy’s name, she began looking on the internet and discovered a British heavy rock band called Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell, “named after a 17th century English naval commander” – obviously some variety in the spelling of his name!

Since her visit she has done further research and found The Ship and Shovell pub in Craven Passage, Charing Cross and was told by the Rochester Museum that there were a couple of pubs so-named. The pub in Charing Cross, although it is one, is on both sides of the passage and Jan tells us that it is lovely and cosy and inside there is another piece about the gentleman with his name spelt “Clowdisley”. Further, when looking for directions from Camden to Highbury, she noticed there was a Cloudsley Road along with a Street, Place and Square, all named after Cloudsley in Islington.


‘Asperatus’ Latin name gets the thumbs up

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Asperatus over Evans County, Georgia, US. Photo by LeeAnna Tatum.

Asperatus over Evans County, Georgia, US. Photo by LeeAnna Tatum.

We were very pleased to learn that our campaign to get a new cloud classification added to the official naming system has been helped by a Latin scholar. Dr. Rick LaFleur, Franklin Professor of Classics Emeritus at the University of Georgia, is one of the most respected Latinists in the United States. He discussed our choice of name for the cloud type in his regular column about the Latin roots of words for The Apalachiola and Carrabelle Times. The piece is called ‘Cloudy with a chance of crab cakes’.


Asperatus Clouds Spotted over Georgia and North Carolina, US

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Monday 30 March saw a fantastic display of asperatus clouds over Georgia and North Carolina, US. The photographs below on the Society gallery were taken by LeeAnna Tatum of The Claxton Enterprise newspaper. At the bottom of the page, you can see time-lapse video of the formation.

Asperatus over Evans County, Georgia, US. Photograph by LeeAnna Tatum. © The Claxton Enterprise

Asperatus over Evans County, Georgia, US. Photograph by LeeAnna Tatum. © The Claxton Enterprise


Asperatus over Statesboro, Georgia, US. © Sarah K. Davis

Asperatus over Statesboro, Georgia, US. © Sarah K. Davis



This video posted by the US National Weather Service Columbia, South Carolina

This video posted by the US National Weather Service Columbia, South Carolina


Lenticularis over Wales

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On the 7th March a particularly dramatic display of lenticularis clouds formed over North Wales. They were of the form known as ‘pile d’assiettes’. This is the French for a pile of plates and refers to lenticular clouds that have the distinctive stacked appearance. You can see examples of the formations sent in to our photo gallery below.

TracyLennies

GeorgeLennie
 
DickLennies

JuliaLennie


Lenticular cloud, Moon, Mars and Venus

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Lenticular cloud, Moon, Mars and Venus ©  Nuno Serrão

Cloud enthusiast, Bernard L Reymond, recently sent us the link to NASA’s Cloud of the Day for 2nd March. This is an image of a Lenticular cloud, the Moon, Mars and Venus and was taken by Nuno Serrão. Once you have read all the information onthe NASA website about this photograph, you might also enjoy watching the associated video.